I’ve been a developer for six weeks. Here are the code school skills I actually use.

In December 2016 I finished the Front-End Engineering program at The Iron Yard in Salt Lake City. In January I was offered a job and in February I started that job. So what did I learn in bootcamp that’s helped me daily?

How to read code

I used to beat myself up constantly for being able to read code and understand what it’s doing, but not being able to write it myself. And then I got a job at a place with multiple giant codebases and it turns out that reading code and understanding it is the more important thing (at least right now – I was here four weeks before I needed to write anything from scratch). Every week I’m introduced to a new thing at work, and lo and behold, all that practice I got reading code during school comes in handy again.

How to focus among a gazillion distractions

Write/read/test code while groups chat and laugh five feet away and there are Nerf gun torpedoes being shot at my head and some delicious smell is coming from the nearby kitchen? Yes, yes I can. In school we were encouraged to spend our afternoon lab time together, so I quickly developed the ability to be in a small area with a bunch of people and a lot of talking and interruptions, and still stay on task. At my previous job, I often had to use earbuds and brown noise to block everything out – now I don’t even notice it.

How to learn

I’ve always been a capable student and never had a problem learning things. But with bootcamps, it’s a firehose of information, and this job has been no different – learning in this kind of environment is a beast. The brain has to quickly filter through the hundreds of things being thrown at it, decide what’s most important and useful, grab onto those varying pieces of information, and then plug them in where needed hours or days or weeks later. I was able to practice this at The Iron Yard for twelve straight weeks and it has paid off immensely.

How to ask questions

Part of our pre-bootcamp coursework was to watch this talk on getting technical help. You should definitely check it out. Asking for help is complicated in our field. Knowing what information I need to convey to my team and how to communicate it succinctly, quickly, and in a way that gets the most helpful answer is something I work on daily – if I hadn’t spent so much time practicing it at The Iron Yard, my first weeks here would have been much worse.

How to ride the emotional rollercoaster of dev work

You caught that, right? What I said about it being worse? It implies those first weeks on the job were bad, and they were. If you’ve read my posts, you know that I almost quit in week 3 of bootcamp. Every week was so full of ups and downs that I could oscillate between wanting to quit and knowing I’d made the right career change decision four times a day! And so when I wanted to walk out of this job in week three and never return, I knew enough to ride it out. When I’m feeling especially stupid (happens often), I know that I just need to give it time and I’ll get it.

How to talk to complete strangers

Not only were we encouraged to go to meetups all over Salt Lake City, we were often thrown into on-campus networking events with little notice, or required to pair with people we didn’t know at all. The result? I can approach anyone at my job or at meetups, and I can successfully pair with any teammate. I know this isn’t a big deal to plenty of folks, but this was a skill I did not have before The Iron Yard, and it’s been huge for me.

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I can’t be the only bootcamp grad whose first job uses a different language than the one studied in school, and I’m so glad I can still get some ROI for my $25,000 (tuition plus three months of not working). So, my advice to anyone attending or considering code school — spend as much time focusing on the soft skills as you do on the actual code. It’ll pay off.

Author: Ashly

I like learning, food, travel, and sports, and I love Salt Lake City.